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Prune and apple soufflé recipe

Prune and apple soufflé recipe



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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Dessert
  • Fruit desserts
  • Apple desserts

There's no need to be nervous about making a soufflé, as it isn't at all difficult. This soufflé is flavoured with prunes cooked in apple juice, both naturally sweet, so the mixture needs no sugar to sweeten it.

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 125 g (4½ oz) ready-to-eat stoned prunes
  • 120 ml (4 fl oz) apple juice
  • 3 large eggs, separated
  • 2 tbsp double cream
  • 2 tsp icing sugar, sifted

MethodPrep:2hr20min ›Cook:20min ›Ready in:2hr40min

  1. Put the prunes in a small saucepan with the apple juice. Cover and leave to soak for at least 2 hours, or overnight if more convenient.
  2. Heat the prunes until they start to simmer, then simmer gently for about 5 minutes or until very tender. Purée in the pan with a hand-held blender, or in a blender or food processor.
  3. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F, gas mark 6), and put a baking sheet in to heat. Lightly grease a 1 litre (1¾ pint) soufflé dish that is 15 cm (6 in) in diameter. In a mixing bowl, lightly whisk together the egg yolks and cream, then stir in the prune purée.
  4. In another bowl, clean and grease-free, whisk the egg whites until stiff. Stir 2 tbsp of the egg whites into the prune mixture to loosen it, then carefully fold in the rest with a large metal spoon.
  5. Pour the mixture into the soufflé dish. Set on the hot baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes or until the soufflé is risen and just slightly wobbly when very gently shaken. Quickly dust the top with the icing sugar, then serve immediately.

Each serving provides

A, B12 * B2, iron, zinc

Some more ideas

For a mango and orange soufflé, replace the prunes with dried mangoes, and simmer in orange juice with 1 tbsp clear honey instead of apple juice. * To make individual banana and rum soufflés, mash 2 medium-sized ripe bananas until smooth, then stir in 2 tbsp dark rum. Use this instead of the prune purée. Divide the mixture among 6 lightly greased 150 ml (5 fl oz) ramekin dishes. Place on the hot baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Dust with icing sugar and serve immediately.

Plus points

Prunes provide useful amounts of potassium, iron and vitamin B6. The vitamin C in the apple juice will help the body to absorb the iron in the prunes. * Although fruit juices like apple have little fibre – unlike the original fruit – they still retain the other nutrients such as good amounts of vitamin C and other antioxidants. * Eggs are a useful and convenient food, suitable for both sweet and savoury dishes. They are also good for you, boosting the intake of many essential nutrients including protein, vitamins B12, A and D, and zinc.

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How To : Make the perfect Soufflé with Delia Smith of the BBC

In this BBC cookery clip Delia Smith reveals her secrets for making the perfect soufflé.

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Mutual Love of Prunes is One Bond I Have with Gabriella

The Prune Soufflé that my mother used to make from her 1940s edition of the ‘Joy of Cooking’

It was May, 2004, during a glitzy dinner celebrating that year’s James Beard Awards at a mid-Manhattan hotel.

Gabriella Gershenson, at that time a fledgling food writer living in New York, was seated next to me. I discovered that I and this soft-spoken young woman with thick, wavy black hair and a winning smile were kindred souls.

Soon we were discussing our shared passion: little-known ethnic food finds tucked away on the culinary road less travelled. She told me about her specialty: “Food not served by a waiter.”

Two days later, we were strolling through New York’s Chinatown, Chelsea and the Lower East Side. Most of the spots we visited still exist: Donut Plant, Kossar’s Bialys, Russ & Daughters, Fried Dumpling, Vegetarian Dim Sum House among them. I wrote a column about that rewarding day in the Toronto Star where I was the food editor and columnist. (I resigned in 2007 and am now a freelance Food Sleuth specializing in podcasts and blog posts like this one.)

In addition to an appetite for intrepid food sleuthing, Gabriella and I have these things in common: Her Jewish family’s roots are in Riga, Latvia she was born in the U.S. shortly after they emigrated in 1975. My refugee family on my mother’s side came to North America in 1939 but also suffered death and destruction during the Holocaust in Riga, Latvia. (See Gabriella’s 2011 article in Saveur about re-visiting her Latvian roots.)

Gabriella studied at McGill and spent time living in Montreal – she loves that city. My dad was born and raised in Montreal, my parents met at McGill and I was born in Montreal. I too have a fondness for that place.

Last but not least, we both share a quirky love of prunes – a much-maligned fruit.

Gabriella and I move in the same professional world and have kept loosely in touch and know many of our peers in food journalism. I reached out recently when I planned to spend a week in the Big Apple including a birthday lunch at the exquisite Le Bernardin. She agreed to come to our hotel the day after that to record a podcast. It was heartwarming to catch up.

Today, 14 years later, Gabriella sports longer hair, is married and has an impressive body of work.

Based in New York, she is a food writer and editor who has worked at Rachael Ray Every Day, Saveur and Time Out New York. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Boston Globe and many other publications. She does radio (Heritage Radio, CBC), TV (Food Network) and moderates talks on food. You can find her on Twitter as @gabiwrites.

Here’s the memorable Prune Soufflé my mum used to make inspired by the chat with my kindred soul. It’s followed by the Epicurious recipe that Gabriella often makes for stuffed zucchini. Both are delicious. (Btw, Gabriella included David Leibovitz’s recipe for Cherry Gateau Basque in one of her articles. I made it and took the glorious result to my communal office – to rave reviews.)

Prune Soufflé

This is adapted from my mother’s tattered and stained edition of the 1940s (maybe the first) edition of the Joy of Cooking from which she learned to cook. As a child, I used to ask for it on my birthday. The prune mixture makes a little more than you need – you can freeze the remainder or fold it into yogurt or vanilla ice cream.

1 lb/500g soft prunes
¼ cup granulated sugar
½ lemon, sliced
1 cinnamon stick

In shallow bowl, cover with prunes with hot water about 30 minutes to 1 hour. Transfer mixture to saucepan add sugar, lemon and cinnamon stick. Bring to a boil reduce the heat to low and simmer about 30 minutes or until prunes are soft and mixture is thickened. Discard lemon slices and cinnamon stick. Mash with potato masher or blend in food processor until small pieces of prune remain. Reserve a little more than 1 cup pureed prune mixture cool. (Save the remaining prune mixture for another use – add to granola and yogurt for a breakfast dish or mix with a little brandy and fold into vanilla ice cream.)

5 egg whites, at room temperature
⅛ tsp salt
¼ tsp cream of tartar

Beat egg whites and salt in medium-large bowl until foamy. Add cream of tartar beat until stiff peaks form. Fold in cooled prune mixture. Transfer mixture to 9-inch soufflé dish. Bake in oven about 1 hour or until firm. Serve hot, warm or cold with custard sauce, yogurt or vanilla ice cream.

Lebanese Stuffed Zucchini

I used a mixture of medium-to-large green and yellow zucchini for this delicious dish Gabriella makes often. It’s from Epicurious.

6 medium zucchini (6 to 8 oz each)
½ cup long-grain rice
2 tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
¾ lb/375 g ground beef or lamb (not lean)
1 tsp ground allspice
2 tsp salt
¾ tsp ground black pepper
2 cups canned diced tomatoes (including juice)
1 cup chicken stock
Juice of half a lemon

Hollow out each zucchini, working from both ends with a small melon-ball cutter or an apple corer, removing all seeds and leaving shells about ⅓ inch thick. Discard pulp and seeds.

Wash rice in several changes of cold water in a bowl until water runs almost clear, then drain in a sieve.

Heat oil in a deep 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking. Add onion, stirring, and cook until golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, 1 minute, then remove skillet from heat.

Transfer ¼ cup onion mixture to medium bowl cool slightly. Add rice, ground beef, allspice, 1½ teaspoons salt, and ½ teaspoon pepper mix well with your hands. Stuff zucchini shells with mixture, being careful not to pack tightly (rice will expand during cooking).

Add tomatoes with juice, stock, remaining ½ teaspoon salt, and remaining ¼ teaspoon pepper to onion in skillet bring to a simmer. Place stuffed zucchini in tomato mixture in skillet simmer, covered, until rice is cooked through, 1 to 1¼ hours (cut 1 zucchini in half crosswise to check).

Transfer zucchini to a plate bring sauce to a boil and simmer, stirring, until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Return zucchini to sauce. Squeeze lemon over dish before serving.


A Prune Recipe Book

Prunes are not everybody's first choice of ingredient.

Prunes are not everybody's first choice of ingredient. If they are cooked properly and used correctly, they can be the cook's best friend. They have a unique flavor and can turn a dish into very delicious food. Historically, the prune functions as medicine for indigestion constipation. Things need not be so morbid. Prunes are high in natural sugar and can be a good substitute for sugar when baking. We can cook them with many types of meat, using a range of complimenting spice and herbs. They are also fit for younger people to eat. It's not clear why they are associated with elderly folk only. There are 'how-to' lessons and recipes enclosed. Take a copy and start today.


Prune and apple soufflé recipe - Recipes

R E C I P E S

La Coupetado (Prune and Raisin Bread Pudding)

This bread pudding from the department of Lozère in southern France, historically one of the poorest departments in the country and still the least populous, is named for the ceramic dish in which it’s baked, lou coupet. No cookbooks appear to have been published in the region decades back, but I believe the original recipe was very simple: no vanilla, no butter, no water bath to ensure slow cooking — instead the earthenware coupet moderated the heat. The bread would have been sourdough, although now brioche is sometimes used. My suggestion of Armagnac, which goes well with prunes, certainly isn’t part of the original. Unpitted prunes have a little more flavor, and if you use those, pit them first. The two best flavors for bread pudding are probably this synergistic combination of prune and raisin, followed by apple (see Apple Bread Pudding).

a dozen (120 gr) pitted prunes

a large handful (60 gr) raisins

¼ cup (60 ml) Armagnac, optional

3 cups (750 ml) whole milk

½ vanilla bean

unsalted butter for the mold

slices of slightly stale white or near-white bread, no more than ½ inch (1 cm) thick, enough to make three layers in the baking dish

3 large eggs

½ cup (100 gr) sugar

Soak the prunes and raisins in ¼ cup Armagnac, if you use it. Heat the milk with the half vanilla bean over a medium flame until the milk shows the first signs of bubbling. Set aside to steep and cool.

Butter a deep 1½-quart (1½-liter) ceramic baking dish (I believe a coupet is always bowl-shaped, but a 7-inch, or 18-cm, soufflé mold also works well). Place a layer of bread in the bottom, then one of fruit, bread again, fruit again, and bread on top — a wider, shallower dish may hold just two layers of bread with fruit between.

Remove the vanilla bean from the milk (rinse and save it for a future use). Whisk the milk, eggs, and sugar, and pour the mixture over the bread and fruit. Let the bread soak 10 minutes, so it doesn’t float so much. Bake in a 350° F (180° C) oven until the custard has swollen and turned golden on top — roughly 45 minutes, depending on the dimensions and material of the dish. When the pudding is warm to lukewarm, run a knife around the edge, if needed. Place a dessert platter over the top and carefully invert the two together. Serve warm to room temperature, not chilled Serves 6 to 8.


Pork chop with prunes recipe

My mother used to cook this recipe for me as a child, often to celebrate a special occasion. 50 years later, we teach it in the Raymond Blanc Cookery School to our own young cooks of the future, and they love it just as much. You might have noticed that my mother would hardly ever use stocks - only water. She truly believed that fresh meat or vegetables would have enough flavour of their own to lend character and definition to a dish. I think that, in the context of home cooking, she was absolutely right.

Ingredients Required

For the pork loin

Cooking Method

Step 1

Stir in the prunes in the cognac and leave to soak 12 hours prior to cooking.

Step 2

In a medium ovenproof frying pan on a low-medium heat, add the oil, season the meat with salt and place skin side down in the pan for 10 minutes.

Start with one edge for 5 minutes, then turn it onto the other edge of the skin for a further 5 minutes, ensuring the whole skin is evenly browned and crispy.

Once an evenly crisp skin has been achieved, remove the pork from the pan, discard the oil.

Step 3

Add half of the butter and, on a medium heat, bring it to a light hazelnut stage.

Return the pork to the pan on its flesh side, reduce the heat a little and pan-fry for 5 minutes.

Do not move the pork, so the juices run out to create a beautiful residue on the bottom of the pan. It should be a gentle sizzling noise, not aggressive.

Once a golden brown colour has been achieved on one side, turn the meat over to cook the other side for the same amount of time and add the trimmings.

Baste the chop with the foaming butter.

Step 4

Meanwhile, in a separate small frying pan on a medium heat, add the remaining butter and the pork trimmings. Brown for 5 minutes, but do not stir.

Add 50ml water and de-glaze the pan. Transfer the trimmings and all the juices to the pan with the pork. Place the pork on top of the trimmings. They will serve as a trivet to keep the meat away
from direct heat and allow the heat to circulate.

Add the garlic, thyme and sage.

Step 5

Transfer the pan to the preheated oven and roast for 30 minutes until you reach a core temperature of 60°C.

Step 6

Remove the pork from the pan and leave to rest on a plate for 15 minutes, covered with tin foil. Some wonderful things will now happen!

As the meat relaxes, the juices will flow out, and at the same time, the temperature of the meat will continue to rise, up to 65-66ºC. There is a mistaken belief that resting is only to relax the meat. It is true the heat contracts it, but the heat has momentum and energy of its own, and during resting, the temperature can rise by up to 20% in 30 minutes. Then it will decline.

Step 7

Place the frying pan back on the stove on a medium heat, add the pork juices from the plate and de-glaze with the Madeira. Boil for a few seconds.

Add the water and, using a spatula, stir thoroughly to incorporate all the residue created during the roasting.

Taste and correct the seasoning, strain the jus and return to the pan.

Step 8

Add the soaked prunes and simmer gently for 3-5 minutes. Strain. Serve with potato purée and steamed cabbage. You can choose to carve the meat in front of your guests or in the discretion of your kitchen.

Chef tips

"Other meats can be cooked this way for example, a large rib of beef, a veal chop, or a simple pork chop. They invariably provide a quick and delicious meal for the family."

"Plums, damsons, apples, mirabelles and other fruits could accompany this dish."

Voila!

Share this recipe

Recipe © Raymond Blanc 2018
Food Photography © Chris Terry 2018

Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons: The Story of a Modern Classic

A personal tour of Raymond Blanc's legendary restaurant-hotel through the four seasons, with 120 recipes from his celebrated kitchens.

Set in the rolling Oxfordshire hills, Le Manoir is a bastion of haute cuisine and a beacon of l'art de vivre. It is also the only country house hotel in Britain to have held two Michelin stars for more than three decades.

This book is Raymond's personal tour of Le Manoir through the seasons the ultimate host, he lovingly reveals the stories behind the incredible rooms and gardens that guests travel the world over to experience. But it is food that is at the heart of Le Manoir, and here you will find the recipes for its most celebrated dishes, which range from those that can be recreated at home - such as Soupe au pistou and Soufflé de rhubarbe - to the sensational creations - including Thème sur la tomate and Cassolette d'abricot - which have earned the restaurant its status as one of the world's legendary gastronomic destinations.

With spectacular photography of the exquisite dishes, inviting rooms and the prized gardens, as well as beautiful and witty illustrations, the fairy tale of Le Manoir has been brought charmingly to life.


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Published: 00:15 BST, 11 September 2016 | Updated: 00:15 BST, 11 September 2016

A wonderful roast using the tender fillet and served with a fruit stuffing.

1 large onion, roughly chopped

1 medium Bramley apple, peeled and chopped very finely

3 good pork sausages, skinned

50g (2oz) ready-to-eat dried prunes, roughly chopped

1 tbsp fresh sage, chopped

salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 x 450g (1lb) pork fillets, trimmed

● Preheat the oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7.

● First, make the stuffing. Melt the butter in a frying pan over a high heat, add the onion and fry for a minute. Cover and cook over a low heat for about 15 minutes or until tender. Add the apple and toss for a few moments. Set aside to cool.

● Put the sausage meat, prunes and sage in a bowl, season with salt and pepper, and then tip in the onion and apple. Stir to combine.

● Arrange the two fillets on a board, cover with clingfilm and, using a rolling pin, bash them so they are about a third thinner but equal in size.

● Remove the clingfilm, spread the stuffing over one fillet and sit the other fillet on top.

● Lay eight slices of Parma ham on a board, slightly overlapping, and sit the fillets on top so they lie across the ham. Roll up like a roulade so the Parma ham is sealed underneath.

● Sit in a roasting tin and roast in the preheated oven for about 45-55 minutes until crispy and cooked through. Transfer to a plate to rest.

● To make the gravy, sprinkle the flour into the roasting tin, place over a high heat and whisk in the apple juice and stock. Cook to reduce and serve with slices of the stuffed pork.

Can be stuffed and kept raw in the fridge up to a day ahead. Freezes well stuffed and raw.

Roast on the second set of runners in the roasting oven for about 50 minutes.


Prune and apple soufflé recipe - Recipes

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    Prune and apple soufflé recipe - Recipes

    This policy contains information about your privacy. By posting, you are declaring that you understand this policy:

    • Your name, rating, website address, town, country, state and comment will be publicly displayed if entered.
    • Aside from the data entered into these form fields, other stored data about your comment will include:
      • Your IP address (not displayed)
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      This policy is subject to change at any time and without notice.

      These terms and conditions contain rules about posting comments. By submitting a comment, you are declaring that you agree with these rules:

      • Although the administrator will attempt to moderate comments, it is impossible for every comment to have been moderated at any given time.
      • You acknowledge that all comments express the views and opinions of the original author and not those of the administrator.
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