Quince compote

We start by putting the quinces in cold water to clean them better of down. Then we cut them into slices and then cubes with the peel.

Wash the jars and lids, then fill the jars with quince. I filled them to the brim with jars and on top of each jar I put 3 tablespoons of sugar to make it sweet. After we have finished adding sugar, we fill them with water up to the top and put the lids on. We screw them well and put them to sterilize, but before that, we shake the jars a little to dissolve a little sugar. When the quince cubes have risen up and the water has colored, it means that they are ready to be removed from the sterilizer.

Then prepare a towel and put the hot jars with the lids down and cover them with a blanket or other towel. We leave them like this for 2 days, then at the pantry with them.


Preparation Quince compote

Wash the fruits and cut them into cubes (or slices, as desired). Place the fruit in jars. Add 3 tablespoons of sugar and top with warm water. We close the jars and sterilize in a bain-marie for 30 minutes from the moment the water started to boil.

Leave the jars in the pot in which they boiled, until the water cools. We take out the jars, label and store them cold in the pantry.

Try this video recipe too


Quince compote - Recipes

We included the Quince compote in the Romanian Cuisine category, not only because it is a traditional Compote in our country & # 8211 and because all the Compotes is made for generations in Romanian homes, but also because Quince it is not a very popular fruit in other countries, and in some kitchens there is none!

Besides being very tasty, Quinces contain a lot of Vitamin C and other nutrients that increase immunity. And they appear exactly when we need them, on the eve of winter! So, in autumn, get your hands on some Quinces and eat them raw, with sugar or quickly boil a Compote of them!

The Quince Compote recipe is super simple, with no unusual ingredients. Complicating would be just preparing Gutui dishes. If you want to preserve the Quince Compote for longer, then you must also sterilize the jars. But as this compote is so good freshly boiled, and the quinces keep raw for a long time, I prefer to prepare it only when we enjoy it!

Whichever option you choose, the compote can be made in the same way without preservatives, Quinces being preserved only in Sugar Syrup with Lemon.

And if you're still making compote, NOT throw the Hedges and Shells! Boil them and you will get a delicious Quince Pelta (Recipe).

And when you don't (anymore) have Quinces, order them online! And at the same time buy other ingredients you need:


Final preparations

So, I'm almost done preparing the quince compote. Although its recipe is simple, it takes a long time to implement. And now all you have to do is throw slices of quince fruit into clean jars about 1/5 of its depth and pour everything with hot syrup. You need to wrap them immediately and then, as usual, turn them upside down and cover with something warm until they cool completely. The result will be even more successful if you combine quince with other fruits. Here is the will of the host's imagination. But the most delicious combinations are with apples or grapes, because they have a sour-sweet taste similar to quince. It can also be combined with pears, melons, oranges, lemons or various berries - blueberries, currants, blackcurrants.


Quince compote - Recipes

We included the Quince compote in the Romanian Cuisine category, not only because it is a traditional Compote in our country & # 8211 and because all the Compotes is made for generations in Romanian homes, but also because Quince it is not a very popular fruit in other countries, and in some kitchens there is none!

Besides being very tasty, Quinces contain a lot of Vitamin C and other nutrients that increase immunity. And they appear exactly when we need them, on the eve of winter! So, in autumn, get your hands on some Quinces and eat them raw, with sugar or quickly boil a Compote of them!

The Quince Compote recipe is super simple, with no unusual ingredients. Complicating would be just preparing Gutui dishes. If you want to preserve the Quince Compote for longer, then you must also sterilize the jars. But as this compote is so good freshly boiled, and the quinces keep raw for a long time, I prefer to prepare it only when we enjoy it!

Whichever option you choose, the compote can be made in the same way without preservatives, Quinces being preserved only in Sugar Syrup with Lemon.

And if you're still making compote, NOT throw the Hedges and Shells! Boil them and you will get a delicious Quince Pelta (Recipe).

And when you don't (anymore) have Quinces, order them online! And at the same time buy other ingredients you need:


RECIPE. How to prepare the best quince compote. It's very simple!

RECIPE. How to prepare the best quince compote. It's very simple!

GUTUI COMPOT. The quinces taste delicious and are full of vitamins. If you want to eat them other than raw, make a GUTUI COMPOT.

SOURCE: REALITATEA.NET

AUTHOR: REALITATEA.NET

GUTUI COMPOT. Ingredient:

4-5 drops
3-4 tablespoons of sugar per liter of liquid

RECIPE. How to make a delicious quince jam

GUTUI COMPOT. Method of preparation:

The quinces are washed well with down, then cut into cubes. Boil them in enough water to cover them and add the sugar.

Bring to the boil for 20 minutes, then remove from the heat.

It can be consumed immediately or stored for the winter, putting the compote in jars that are boiled in a water bath for 30 minutes.


1 kg of quince is washed thoroughly, cut into slices about 1.5 cm wide, remove the stony middle and seeds, peel. Wash again, taste according to the recipe prescribed in "Apple Compote" and cook for about 20 minutes until soft. The syrup is sweetened with 3 tablespoons of honey. Gourmets boil apples and quinces in sweet must and not in water, because it gives them a spicy and special taste. Those who like exotic tastes can add Japanese quince. In our area, there are few who plant such a tree that grows up to 3 m, although it withstands winter conditions and pollution well.


The compote can also be prepared from other fruits, for example: stronger pears, plums with seeds glued to the core, rows, apricots and peaches with seeds that come off the core. Less honey is added to these and no cinnamon or cloves are used. When preparing the compote, the fully ripe fruits do not correspond to jams, because they are difficult to peel and, when boiled, they are crushed like jam. They should not be too strong, because the seeds cannot be removed, and the unripe fruits do not taste good. Pears and apricots are cut in half before peeling to avoid stressful slipping of the hands when unpacking. Completely cleaned apricots are not pressed because they break in the hands. The two halves twist in the opposite direction, so they unravel without breaking. Peaches, as well as apricots, boil about 1.5 kg in 10 liters of water for 10 minutes.


Because the compote prepared from winter apples is not very good in taste, and the summer fruits are not kept raw for a long time, the compote prepared from fresh fruits will be preserved by dry sterilization, according to the recipe from "Preserving the pot". Before filling the jars, bring another boil to sterilize the honey. These compotes can be eaten canned, the honey added later gives them a better taste as if they were sterilized in water. If about 0.5% vinegar is added to the syrup before boiling, the fruits remain firm and crunchy. But as not everyone can stand the special taste of acid, it is good to try with a portion of 1-2 jars. In the case of a large conservation action, sometimes there is no time or the necessary tools for weighing the raw material are missing. In such a situation, put as much water over the cleaned fruits as they are almost covered, and the amount of honey is determined by tasting the syrup.
Other simple recipes recommended


1 kg of quince is washed thoroughly, cut into slices about 1.5 cm wide, remove the stony middle and seeds, peel. Wash again, taste according to the recipe prescribed in "Apple Compote" and cook for about 20 minutes until soft. The syrup is sweetened with 3 tablespoons of honey. Gourmets boil apples and quinces in sweet must and not in water, because it gives them a spicy and special taste. Those who like exotic tastes can add Japanese quince. In our area, there are few who plant such a tree that grows up to 3 m, although it withstands winter conditions and pollution well.


The compote can also be prepared from other fruits, for example: stronger pears, plums with seeds glued to the core, rows, apricots and peaches with seeds that come off the core. Less honey is added to these and no cinnamon or cloves are used. When preparing the compote, the fully ripe fruits do not correspond to jams, because they are difficult to peel and, when boiled, they are crushed like jam. They should not be too strong, because the seeds cannot be removed, and the unripe fruits do not taste good. Pears and apricots are cut in half before peeling to avoid stressful slipping of the hands when unpacking. Completely cleaned apricots are not pressed because they break in the hands. The two halves twist in the opposite direction, so they unravel without breaking. Peaches, as well as apricots, boil about 1.5 kg in 10 liters of water for 10 minutes.


Because the compote prepared from winter apples is not very good in taste, and the summer fruits are not kept raw for a long time, the compote prepared from fresh fruits will be preserved by dry sterilization, according to the recipe from "Preserving the pot". Before filling the jars, bring another boil to sterilize the honey. These compotes can be eaten canned, the honey added later gives them a better taste as if they were sterilized in water. If about 0.5% vinegar is added to the syrup before boiling, the fruits remain firm and crunchy. But since not everyone can stand the special taste of acid, it is good to try with a portion of 1-2 jars. In the case of a large conservation action, sometimes there is no time or the necessary tools for weighing the raw material are missing. In such a situation, put as much water over the cleaned fruits as they are almost covered, and the amount of honey is determined by tasting the syrup.
Other simple recipes recommended


Differences from other quince compote recipes

You can find both on the internet and among housewives a lot of other derived derivatives of the simple recipe above. For example, you can add vanilla, anise or cinnamon if you like these flavors.

Another difference would be the amount of sugar used. Many housewives use 1 liter of water, one kilogram of sugar, but also 2 sachets of vanilla sugar.

Among the many existing quince compote recipes, another peculiarity has a recipe in which the jars filled with hot syrup and fruit are put after they have been closed with lids, in a large pot filled with water to be boiled about 30 -40 minutes.

The only solution is to try one of these quince compote recipes every fall to see the differences in taste, which are very small anyway, and to choose the one you like the most.

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1 kg of quince is washed thoroughly, cut into slices about 1.5 cm wide, remove the stony middle and seeds, peel. Wash again, taste according to the recipe prescribed in "Apple Compote" and cook for about 20 minutes until soft. The syrup is sweetened with 3 tablespoons of honey. Gourmets boil apples and quinces in sweet must and not in water, because it gives them a spicy and special taste. Those who like exotic tastes can add Japanese quince. In our area, there are few who plant such a tree that grows up to 3 m, although it withstands winter conditions and pollution well.


The compote can also be prepared from other fruits, for example: stronger pears, plums with seeds glued to the core, rows, apricots and peaches with seeds that come off the core. Less honey is added to these and no cinnamon or cloves are used. When preparing the compote, the fully ripe fruits do not correspond to jams, because they are difficult to peel and, when boiled, they are crushed like jam. They should not be too strong, because the seeds cannot be removed, and the unripe fruits do not taste good. Pears and apricots are cut in half before peeling to avoid stressful slipping of the hands when unpacking. Completely cleaned apricots are not pressed because they break in the hands. The two halves twist in the opposite direction, so they unravel without breaking. Peaches, as well as apricots, boil about 1.5 kg in 10 liters of water for 10 minutes.


Because the compote prepared from winter apples is not very good in taste, and the summer fruits are not kept raw for a long time, the compote prepared from fresh fruits will be preserved by dry sterilization, according to the recipe from "Preserving the pot". Before filling the jars, bring another boil to sterilize the honey. These compotes can be eaten canned, the honey added later gives them a better taste as if they were sterilized in water. If about 0.5% vinegar is added to the syrup before boiling, the fruits remain firm and crunchy. But since not everyone can stand the special taste of acid, it is good to try with a portion of 1-2 jars. In the case of a large conservation action, sometimes there is no time or the necessary tools for weighing the raw material are missing. In such a situation, put as much water over the cleaned fruits as they are almost covered, and the amount of honey is determined by tasting the syrup.
Other simple recipes recommended


Preservative-free quince compote recipes

The first compote recipe we present to you is practically the classic one, the one that does not use preservatives to keep the compote for a very long time without spoiling.

This compote recipe is suitable not only for quince, but also for apples, pears or other hard fruits. It is wonderful to fill your pantry with also healthy delicacies that help the immune system over the winter.

We generally recommend using healthy quince compote recipes that do not contain chemical preservatives. An example would be preservative powder or aspirin, because sugar itself has preservative properties.

To remember!

Remember the following aspect: the success of this recipe also depends on how clean and well pasteurized the brocanele are. They should be washed with warm water and dishwashing detergent, rinsed in several waters and wiped well.

Subsequently, the jars are placed in a metal tray and filled with boiling water. Leave it for 10 minutes, then empty it of water and put it in the preheated oven at 150 degrees, together with the well-washed lids. Remove from the oven, leave to cool and then are ready to fill with fruit.

The necessary ingredients for 4 jars of 750ml each are the following:

-1.5 kg of quinces ready cleaned, weighed without shell and seeds

-juice from half a lemon

-optionally vanilla, cinnamon, cloves.

The quinces are carefully cleaned, cut into suitable slices and kept in a bowl with cold water mixed with the juice of half a lemon.

After you have finished this operation, place the quince slices in the prepared jars. Put 1l of water on the fire, together with the sugar and let it boil until the foam accumulates on top. The foam must be removed.

Place the jars in a metal tray, carefully pour the boiling syrup over the fruit, cover the jars with sterilized lids and then place the tray with the jars in the preheated oven at 150 degrees.

Subsequently, the temperature in the oven can be reduced to 100 degrees Celsius and leave the broccoli for half an hour. After this operation, turn off the oven and leave the jars to cool. The compote is ready.