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Black-and-White Sesame Tarts

Black-and-White Sesame Tarts



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This recipe makes 12 individual tartlets, but you could easily halve the recipe and just make 6. This recipe is from Elske in Chicago, our #2 Best New Restaurant 2017.

Ingredients

Puddings

  • 1 teaspoon unflavored powdered gelatin
  • 4 ounces white chocolate, chopped
  • 4 ounces milk chocolate, chopped
  • ½ cup granulated sugar, divided

Tart Shells and Assembly

  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 2 tablespoons whole wheat flour
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • A pinch of ground allspice
  • 2¾ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for surface
  • 11 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 5 ounces halvah, crumbled

Special Equipment

  • A jumbo 6-cup muffin pan; four 18-inch piping bags; a 4-inch diameter cookie cutter

Recipe Preparation

Puddings

  • Place ¼ cup cold water in a small bowl and evenly sprinkle gelatin over. Let sit until gelatin is softened, 10–12 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, place white chocolate and regular tahini in a medium bowl, then place milk chocolate and black tahini in another medium bowl. Add a pinch of salt to each bowl and set side by side. Bring cream, milk, ¼ cup granulated sugar, and a big pinch of salt to a simmer in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, whisking to dissolve sugar. Vigorously whisk egg yolks and remaining ¼ cup granulated sugar in a third medium bowl until pale yellow and thick.

  • Remove saucepan from heat and very slowly drizzle about 1 cup hot cream mixture into egg mixture, whisking constantly. Whisk egg mixture into remaining cream mixture in saucepan. Set saucepan over medium heat and cook, whisking constantly, until mixture is thick enough to hold the marks of the whisk, about 3 minutes. Immediately remove from heat and add gelatin mixture; whisk until dissolved.

  • Strain custard through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl (you should have about 4 cups), then divide between the 2 bowls filled with tahini and chocolate. (If you have a kitchen scale and want to be exact, measure out 12 oz. custard per bowl.) Let warm custard sit on top 5 minutes so the heat slowly melts the chocolate.

  • Using an immersion blender (or a regular blender), blend white chocolate mixture until smooth and incorporated. Repeat with milk chocolate mixture (no need to wash blender). Cover each one with plastic wrap, pressing directly onto surface and eliminating air bubbles, and chill puddings until set, at least 4 hours.

  • Remove puddings from fridge, uncover, and whisk vigorously until smooth. Transfer each pudding to a piping bag; twist ends of bags to seal and secure with rubber bands. Cut off tips to create about a ½"-wide opening on each bag.

  • Slide both filled bags side by side into a third piping bag. Simultaneously apply slow, even pressure to filled bags to push puddings into third bag in equal amounts so that they are side by side. Slide out filled bags as they empty and you fill the third bag. Once the third bag is about three-quarters full, remove original bags. Twist end of bag with both fillings and secure with a rubber band. Repeat process, emptying original bags into a fourth bag, twist end to close, and secure with a rubber band. Chill bags at least 1 hour to allow pudding to firm up again.

  • Do Ahead: Puddings can be made 3 days ahead. Keep chilled.

Tart Shells and Assembly

  • Beat eggs, egg yolks, and corn syrup in a small bowl with a fork until no streaks remain. Pulse powdered sugar, whole wheat flour, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, nutmeg, kosher salt, and 2¾ cups all-purpose flour in a food processor to combine. Add butter and pulse until largest pieces are the size of a pea. With the motor running, stream in egg mixture; process until dough forms a single mass around the blade.

  • Transfer dough to a work surface and knead a couple of times to work in dry bits. Divide in half and form each into a ½"-thick disk. Wrap in plastic and chill until firm, at least 2 hours.

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Let 1 disk of dough sit at room temperature until slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Roll out between 2 sheets of parchment paper dusted with all-purpose flour until 1/8" thick (dust with more flour as you work if needed). If dough becomes difficult to handle, slide onto a baking sheet (with parchment) and chill a few minutes before proceeding. Using cutter, punch out 6 rounds; save scraps for another use. Working one at a time, firmly press rounds into muffin cups, working into corners and up sides. Press out any creases so pastry is smooth and an even thickness all over. Prick bottoms of crusts in several places with a fork and freeze until firm, 10–15 minutes.

  • Bake crusts, rotating halfway through, until golden brown, 15–20 minutes. Let cool 15 minutes in pan, then turn out onto a wire rack and let cool completely. Repeat process with remaining disk of dough.

  • Scatter halvah across bottoms of crusts. Snip a ¾"-wide opening from tip of fuller bag of puddings. Applying slow, even pressure and twisting top of bag as you go, pipe puddings in a swirl pattern to fill each crust; start at edges and work your way toward the center. When pudding runs out, continue with remaining bag. Sprinkle tarts with sea salt just before serving.

  • Do Ahead: Dough can be made 3 days ahead; keep chilled. Crusts can be baked 1 day ahead; store tightly wrapped at room temperature.

Recipe by Elske, Chicago, ILReviews Section

Sesame Cheese Sables | French Shortbread Cookies | Step-By-Step photos

A step-by-step process of How to make Sesame Cheese Sables will guide you in baking them accurately.

The French word Sable means “sand”, which is the term French bakers use when the English use the term “breadcrumbs”, as you rub the cold butter, flour and sugar together at the start of the recipe to make a texture like breadcrumbs (or sand). Sablés can be sweet or salty and can be flavored with almonds, lemon, or orange zest or a variety of cheese.

Buttery, crumbly, cheesy, and tad spicy, these biscuits hail from France’s Normandy region and are perfect with a glass of chilled wine or champagne. Coat it with sesame seeds for extra crunch and flavor.

This Festive season gift your loved ones with these healthy and delicious French Sables which is a good way to say you care. Afterall homemade goodies are the best gift one can offer.

Fill the cookies in the jar and decorate with some fancy papers and ribbons and your edible DIY gift is ready to win the heart.

Recipe of Sesame Cheese Sables-French shortbread cookies

Ingredients:

200 Grams Wheat flour
150 grams chilled and diced unsalted butter
150 Grams Grated processed cheese
1-2 tbsp Milk
1 tsp Cayenne pepper
1 tsp Black pepper powder
1 tsp Cumin powder
1 tsp Five-spice powder
1 tsp Chili flake salt
2 tsp White sesame seeds
2 tsp Black sesame seeds
Salt as per taste

1. Tip the flour, chili flake salt, cayenne pepper, five-spice powder, cumin powder, black pepper powder into the bowl of a food processor.

2. Add the diced butter and pulse the ingredients.

3. Add the grated cheese and pulse again until it has sand and crumbly texture.

4. You may need to add a drop of old water.

5. Tip the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and roll into a log and wrap in a clink-film and chill in the refrigerator for 2 hours until firm.

6. Now make a big roll like chapatti and take a round cookie cutter and cut it into circles and arrange it on the baking sheets spacing the biscuits apart.

7. Heat the oven to 180 C and line a baking tray with a parchment paper. Take the log out of the refrigerator.

8. Remove the clingfilm and brush with milk before coating it in black and white sesame seeds.

9. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until crisp and golden. Once completely cooled the sables can be packed.

1. Store it in an air-tight container.
2. It will stay fresh for 2-3 days.
3. You can also refrigerate it for further consumption.


Black sesame macarons with nut butter filling recipe

black and white isn’t simple .

My daughter Peach made clay beads by hand with a wonderful art teacher this summer. This was a two-day process where the beads were carefully molded and dried before painting. She strung them up on a long stretchy cord and presented them to me.

“Here, Mommy,” she said smiling. “These are for you to wear.” She insists I wear them right then. And I comply without second thought. A t-shirt and soccer shorts never looked so fancy.

Peach carefully explains each bead’s significance after placing them around my neck. The blue one is for Daddy. The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles bead, painted green with a red stripe and two white dots, is for brother Grub. The other blue bead with a smiley face is for me. The orange one is for sister Sky-girl. And the middle bead, black with white polka dots, represents God.

“The white dots are the sin,” she says. “The black is good.”

This opened up so many different thoughts for me.

I am slow to write this as I do not want to minimize racial justice and history with beads or words. Words can sometimes seem twisted or trivialize. Words on a page lack the nuances of a spoken voice. I often fear when I write about cute family quips, they are trite and superficial. Or the heavy topics I delve into are not completely addressed, leaving wispy threads that annoy and trigger people. But this, THIS bead represents something I cannot ignore. It is something I think of every day, with every interaction, with the future of my children. It is the whole entanglement and complexity of racial justice and its immorality in history. It represents the twisted white justification of slavery with Christianity. It embodies white privilege. It represents colonialism, the deep dark underbelly that so many people don’t want to talk about. Death. The acculturation. The blood.

And for some of my readers, if I seem like I am overblowing the situation or I am too passionate, then I ask you to look at your own life and think more clearly. White privilege is all around. If you don’t see it then you’re probably white and you ignore what it means. If you recognize it but choose to ignore it, that is the ultimate white privilege. And that ignorance is the sin, like those white dots, that outright colorblindness (sometimes intentional, sometimes not). White privilege is not something I decide to take off, like a shirt: it is stuck into our subconsciousness, our implicit biases. Dismantling the system that supports it is the only way to destroy it, teach subsequent generations about it, and stand strong to not let history repeat itself, like it has in so many flavors from slavery until now (Aside: National news in August: A group of black women were police “escorted” off of a wine-drinking train in Napa Valley because they were too loud? Having fun and drinking wine?? Really? Ever been to a college frat party? I guarantee those guys are much louder, and rude, and infantile. Those ladies were just having fun — on a freakin’ train marketed for the very activity of drinking alcohol in wine country! And what about November’s news about the killing of Laquan McDonald? Or Tamir Rice? Or TOO MANY?). Recognizing race does not make you racist what you do with the information and the biases you may impose on people of color or the subtle microaggressions you employ DOES. Those actions speak volumes on what you believe. Change the system, people. It’s our only hope for humanity. Don’t get me started on misogyny, genderism, LBGTI rights, and other marginalized groups. I COULD GO ON FOR HOURS.

That being said (*adjusts self in chair, clears throat, refills wine glass*) and knowing that this is a food blog teetering on a quick brine in social justice, I’ll get to the original point of the post. Black and white. Beautiful beads. Black sesame. The love-hate relationship many people have with peanuts. Black sesame macarons with peanut butter filling. This recipe is a rich dive into a nut heaven for me: there is the nutty bitter taste of the black sesame seeds mixed with the sweetened peanut butter (perhaps a corollary when thinking about my feelings about social justice…). Want a PB&J version? Remember that wonderful Blue-barb (blueberry-rhubarb) pie I made this summer and the leftover maceration juices? I cooked them down a bit to dissolve the sugar, chilled, then dipped these macarons in it. SO GOOD.

Pick your battles and pick them well. Choose the ones that are important to fight, so that your legacies know history but do not see it continuing to play out in front of their eyes. And appreciate the beads your daughter brings you, every color and design.

One year ago: beer bread (un-yeasted). For a yeasted beer bread, check out my bacon-onion beer bread


Black and White Tahini Tart

  • Author: Rebecca Blackwell
  • Prep Time: 1 hour (plus refrigeration time)
  • Cook Time: 35 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour and 35 minutes (plus refrigeration time)
  • Yield: 10 - 12 slices

Description

White & dark chocolate tahini pastry cream pipped into a crispy tart shell that’s laced with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves.

*Use either a rectangle or 9-inch round tart pan with a removable bottom. The shape of the pan doesn’t matter, but having a removable bottom is essential to getting the pasty crust out of the pan without breaking it.

Ingredients

FOR THE DARK AND WHITE CHOCOLATE TAHINI PASTRY CREAM:

  • 4 oz semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate, cut into small pieces
  • 4 oz white chocolate, cut into small pieces
  • 1½ tsp unflavored gelatin
  • 3 tsp cold water
  • 6 large egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tbsp tahini, divided (ground sesame)

FOR THE TART DOUGH:

  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp allspice
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2/3 cup powdered sugar (confectioners sugar)
  • 1 stick (4 oz) unsalted butter, cut into 1/2 -inch chunks

TO DECORATE:

Instructions

MAKE THE PASTRY CREAM:

  1. Add the dark chocolate to a medium bowl and the white chocolate to another.
  2. In a small dish, stir the gelatin and water together to combine. There should be just enough water to moisten the gelatin, creating a thick paste.
  3. Add the egg yolks and cornstarch to a medium size bowl and whisk to combine.
  4. Set a 1 or 2 cup glass measuring cup next to the stovetop. Add the milk, sugar, and salt to a 4-quart or larger heavy bottomed saucepan and whisk to combine. Cook over medium heat, whisking frequently, just until it barely begins to boil. Pour 1 to 1 & 1/2 cups of the hot milk into the glass measuring cup. (This tempering process will help prevent the eggs from scrambling.)
  5. Slowly pour the hot milk from the measuring cup into the egg yolks, pouring slowly, and whisking constantly. Then, pour everything back into the saucepan and set it over medium-low heat. (You want to continue to heat the eggs slowly so they won’t scramble.)
  6. Cook, whisking constantly, until the custard is thick and begins to boil. Boil, whisking constantly, for about 20 seconds, then remove from the heat and whisk for about 20 seconds longer.
  7. Pour half the pastry cream over the dark chocolate and the other half over the white chocolate. Using your fingers, break the gelatin into small pieces and drop half the pieces into one bowl of pastry cream and the other half into the other. Let sit for 5 minutes to melt the chocolate. Add 1 tsp vanilla to each bowl, then stir until all the chocolate is melted and incorporated along with the vanilla and gelatin.
  8. Cover each bowl with plastic wrap, pressing the wrap over the surface of the pastry cream, and punch a few holes in the surface of the wrap with a sharp knife. Refrigerate until completely cool, at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours. (*While the pastry cream chills, make the tart shell.)
  9. Remove both bowls of pastry cream from the refrigerator. Using an electric mixer, beat 3/4 cup whipping cream until stiff peaks form. Scoop half the whipped cream into the bowl of dark chocolate pastry cream.
  10. Scrape the white chocolate pastry cream into the bowl of the electric mixer along with the remaining whipped cream and add 1/4 cup tahini. Beat at medium speed for about 1 minute, until everything is incorporated and the pastry cream is smooth. Scrape the white chocolate tahini pastry cream back into the original bowl.
  11. Add the dark chocolate pastry cream and whipped cream into the bowl of the electric mixer. Add 1 tbsp tahini and beat the pastry cream, whipped cream, and tahini at medium speed for about 1 minute, until everything is incorporated and the pastry cream is smooth.

MAKE THE PASTRY SHELL:

  1. Add the egg yolks, 1 tbsp whipping cream, and vanilla to a small bowl and whisk to combine.
  2. Add the flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cloves, salt, and powdered sugar to the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a couple of times to combine. Add the pieces of butter to the flour mixture and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal – about 10 pulses.
  3. With the machine running, pour the egg mixture through the feed tube and process just until the dough begins to stick together, about 8-10 seconds. Be careful not to over process.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a large sheet of plastic wrap and knead 2 or 3 times to bring it completely together. Flatten the dough into a 6-inch disk, wrap tightly in the plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 3 days.
  5. After chilling, unwrap the dough and lay it on a lightly floured work surface. (If the dough has been in the refrigerator for longer than 1 hour, you might need to let it sit at room temperature, covered, for 10 minutes or so to allow it to soften up a bit.) If using a 9-inch round pan, roll the dough into an 11-inch circle. If using a rectangle pan, roll the dough into a rectangle that’s at least 20-inches long and 10 or 11-inches wide. Use flour to keep the dough from sticking to your work surface or rolling pin as you roll it out. It can also be helpful to have a large spatula handy, to slide under the dough from time to time to keep it from sticking to your work surface.
  6. Gently wrap the dough around your rolling pin and then unroll over your tart pan. Lifting the edge of the dough, gently ease the dough into the pan. Press the dough against the sides of the pan and into the corners, wrapping the edges of the dough up and over the sides of the pan.
  7. Roll the rolling pin over the top of the tart pan to cut any excess, overhanging dough from the pan and create a clean edge. If any of the dough inside the pan is too thin or torn, use pieces of excess dough to reinforce and repair.
  8. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and put in the freezer for 30 minutes.
  9. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  10. Remove the dough from the freezer and line with a double layer of aluminum foil. Fill with pie weights or dried beans and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the foil and pie weights or beans. Return to the oven and bake 5-10 minutes longer, until the shell is fully baked and golden brown. Remove from the oven to a wire rack and allow to cool completely in the pan before proceeding.

ASSEMBLE THE TART:

  1. Fit two pastry bags with large open star decorator tips (cupcake tips). Fill one bag with the white chocolate tahini pastry cream and the other bag with the dark chocolate tahini pastry cream.
  2. Remove the sides of the tart pan and use the tip of a sharp knife to gently separate the bottom of the tart pan from the pastry shell. Place the shell on a serving platter.
  3. Squeeze generous “stars” of pastry cream into the tart shell in any pattern you like.
  4. Sprinkle the top of the pasty cream with white and black sesame seeds to decorate, if desired.
  5. Cover and refrigerate the tart until ready to serve, up to 24 hours.

Keywords: tahini tart, chocolate tart, dessert recipe, chocolate tahini, rectangle tart, pretty tart, dinner party recipe, beautiful pie


Black-and-White Sesame Tarts - Recipes

I've been baking my way through Yossy Arefi's Snacking Cakes, a cookbook which came out last year. It's an excellent book, the kind that should just take up residence on your kitchen counter because it'll get used so much. The cakes are modest, one-bowl, one-pan affairs, but they're drop-dead delicious. Buckwheat Banana Cake. Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake. Buttermilk Spice Cake. Seeded Zucchini Cake. Minty Chocolate Malt Cake. You'll want to make every single one.

To qualify as a snacking cake, I believe it must be easy to make, with ingredients you mostly already have in your pantry, and requiring only one bowl. Maybe two. You want the making of the cake to soothe you as much as the eating of the cake. Nothing to mess up. No fussy preparation. Just the best kind of mindless baking where you're guaranteed something delicious in an hour or two.

I love this book's extremely narrow focus paired with its impressive breadth of offerings. There's a cake for every mood, every season, every occasion. (I was going to say short of a wedding, but the truth is I would happily eat one of these as a wedding cake, especially if it was a chic City Hall wedding or a crazy Vegas one. Case in point: Grapefruit White Chocolate Cake? Strawberry-Glazed Passion Fruit Cake? Sticky Whiskey Date Cake? I mean.)

Seeing as very few of us have "occasions" to bake for at the moment, I would like to underline the fact that I believe that it is very, very important to have cakes like this in your house at all times right now. They are for breakfast, they are for tea, they stand in for breakfast or as a special dessert—when dessert is usually fruit—they are good eaten standing up and they are good eaten sitting down. The Germans have a word for the food you eat when you're stressed and that word is Nervenfutter (nerve chow) (it's pronounced NAIR-fenn-foot-er). Snacking cakes are the quintessence of Nervenfutter.

Now to this particular cake, the Simple Sesame Cake. It's made with tahini and two kinds of sesame seeds (which I had in my pantry anyway if you only have regular sesame, not black, just do the cake with those). I substituted 1/4 cup oat flour and 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour blend for the all-purpose flour (in fact, have done so in every recipe from this book that I've tried) and the results were velvety and perfect. Max can't stop marveling over the crumb. There's the faintest hint of bitterness from the tahini, and it's so lovely against the almost creamy crumb punctuated with all those tiny little sesame seeds.

If you're a cake pan butterer, then you can strew some of the sesame seeds onto the sides of the pan to truly encrust the entire cake in sesame, but I am an avowed non-butterer of pans, so I just scattered them thickly on top. I love the effect of the black and white sesame together and the gorgeous little crunch from the raw sugar on top. Up until now, the children have competed with us for pieces of each snacking cake I've made. For whatever reason, this one is a little too grown-up for them (it's like a grown-up peanut butter flavor), so we get to eat all of it ourselves.

All hail the snacking cake!

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through them, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Yossy Arefi's Simple Sesame Cake
Adapted from Snacking Cakes
Makes one 9-inch loaf cake
To make this cake gluten-free, replace the all-purpose flour with 1/4 cup oat flour and 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour blend.
Print this recipe!

6 tablespoons (50 grams) sesame seeds (white, black or mixed), divided
3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
1 large egg
1/2 cup (120 milliliters) whole milk
1/2 cup (120 milliliters) well-stirred tahini
1/4 cup (60 milliliters) neutral vegetable oil, such as canola or grapeseed
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 cups (160 grams) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon raw sugar, optional

1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line a standard-sized loaf pan with parchment paper, letting the sides hang over to create a sling.

2. In a large bowl, whisk the granulated sugar and the egg until pale and foamy, about 1 minute. Add the milk, tahini, oil, vanilla and salt. Whisk until smooth. Add the flour(s), 3 tablespoons of the sesame seeds, the baking powder and baking soda. Whisk until well combined.

3. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, tap the pan gently on the counter to release any air bubbles, and smooth the top with a spatula. Sprinkle the remaining 3 tablespoons of sesame seeds on top of the cake and, if using, the raw sugar.

4. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until the cake is puffed and golden, and a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center comes out clean.

5. Transfer the cake to a wire rack and let cool for about 15 minutes. Use the parchment overhang to lift the cake out of the pan and let cool completely before slicing and serving.

Comments

I've been baking my way through Yossy Arefi's Snacking Cakes, a cookbook which came out last year. It's an excellent book, the kind that should just take up residence on your kitchen counter because it'll get used so much. The cakes are modest, one-bowl, one-pan affairs, but they're drop-dead delicious. Buckwheat Banana Cake. Pumpkin Olive Oil Cake. Buttermilk Spice Cake. Seeded Zucchini Cake. Minty Chocolate Malt Cake. You'll want to make every single one.

To qualify as a snacking cake, I believe it must be easy to make, with ingredients you mostly already have in your pantry, and requiring only one bowl. Maybe two. You want the making of the cake to soothe you as much as the eating of the cake. Nothing to mess up. No fussy preparation. Just the best kind of mindless baking where you're guaranteed something delicious in an hour or two.

I love this book's extremely narrow focus paired with its impressive breadth of offerings. There's a cake for every mood, every season, every occasion. (I was going to say short of a wedding, but the truth is I would happily eat one of these as a wedding cake, especially if it was a chic City Hall wedding or a crazy Vegas one. Case in point: Grapefruit White Chocolate Cake? Strawberry-Glazed Passion Fruit Cake? Sticky Whiskey Date Cake? I mean.)

Seeing as very few of us have "occasions" to bake for at the moment, I would like to underline the fact that I believe that it is very, very important to have cakes like this in your house at all times right now. They are for breakfast, they are for tea, they stand in for breakfast or as a special dessert—when dessert is usually fruit—they are good eaten standing up and they are good eaten sitting down. The Germans have a word for the food you eat when you're stressed and that word is Nervenfutter (nerve chow) (it's pronounced NAIR-fenn-foot-er). Snacking cakes are the quintessence of Nervenfutter.

Now to this particular cake, the Simple Sesame Cake. It's made with tahini and two kinds of sesame seeds (which I had in my pantry anyway if you only have regular sesame, not black, just do the cake with those). I substituted 1/4 cup oat flour and 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour blend for the all-purpose flour (in fact, have done so in every recipe from this book that I've tried) and the results were velvety and perfect. Max can't stop marveling over the crumb. There's the faintest hint of bitterness from the tahini, and it's so lovely against the almost creamy crumb punctuated with all those tiny little sesame seeds.

If you're a cake pan butterer, then you can strew some of the sesame seeds onto the sides of the pan to truly encrust the entire cake in sesame, but I am an avowed non-butterer of pans, so I just scattered them thickly on top. I love the effect of the black and white sesame together and the gorgeous little crunch from the raw sugar on top. Up until now, the children have competed with us for pieces of each snacking cake I've made. For whatever reason, this one is a little too grown-up for them (it's like a grown-up peanut butter flavor), so we get to eat all of it ourselves.

All hail the snacking cake!

Note: This post includes affiliate links and I may earn a commission if you purchase through them, at no cost to you. I use affiliate links only for products I love and companies I trust. Thank you.

Yossy Arefi's Simple Sesame Cake
Adapted from Snacking Cakes
Makes one 9-inch loaf cake
To make this cake gluten-free, replace the all-purpose flour with 1/4 cup oat flour and 1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour blend.
Print this recipe!

6 tablespoons (50 grams) sesame seeds (white, black or mixed), divided
3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated sugar
1 large egg
1/2 cup (120 milliliters) whole milk
1/2 cup (120 milliliters) well-stirred tahini
1/4 cup (60 milliliters) neutral vegetable oil, such as canola or grapeseed
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 cups (160 grams) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon raw sugar, optional

1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line a standard-sized loaf pan with parchment paper, letting the sides hang over to create a sling.

2. In a large bowl, whisk the granulated sugar and the egg until pale and foamy, about 1 minute. Add the milk, tahini, oil, vanilla and salt. Whisk until smooth. Add the flour(s), 3 tablespoons of the sesame seeds, the baking powder and baking soda. Whisk until well combined.

3. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, tap the pan gently on the counter to release any air bubbles, and smooth the top with a spatula. Sprinkle the remaining 3 tablespoons of sesame seeds on top of the cake and, if using, the raw sugar.

4. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until the cake is puffed and golden, and a cake tester or skewer inserted into the center comes out clean.

5. Transfer the cake to a wire rack and let cool for about 15 minutes. Use the parchment overhang to lift the cake out of the pan and let cool completely before slicing and serving.


Former Camino pastry chef to open Sesame a Tiny Bakery in Berkeley

While the pastry chef at Oakland&rsquos acclaimed restaurant Camino, Marykate McGoldrick served rustic, seasonal desserts with a sense of place: buckwheat-almond cake with grilled fig leaf whipped cream and strawberries wild huckleberry tart with creme fraiche orange cake with dates and yogurt.

McGoldrick said she could have happily stayed at Camino for years, but the restaurant&rsquos closure in 2018 pushed her to think about opening her own place.

&ldquoI always fantasized about it but I had a hard time figuring how I&rsquod ever do it,&rdquo she said. &ldquoHow would I get the money and the space, especially in the Bay Area?&rdquo

Then, the owners of Camino presented a tempting offer: She could open a bakery within the team&rsquos forthcoming second location of the Kebabery, which is currently under construction in South Berkeley.

The bakery, called Sesame a Tiny Bakery, will occupy about 100 square feet and share production space with the Kebabery.

&ldquoIt&rsquos really, really small, but kind of perfect,&rdquo McGoldrick said.

Sesame a Tiny Bakery will have its own entrance and a few seats but mostly function as a takeout operation. When the bakery and the Kebabery are open at the same time, customers will be able to take a slice of cake over to the Kebabery&rsquos dining room. And at night, Sesame&rsquos not-too-sweet desserts will be available to order at the restaurant.


Black-and-White Sesame Tarts - Recipes

It took me awhile to finally decide on a recipe to make from Henrietta Inman’s gorgeous book Clean Cakes: Delicious patisserie made with whole, natural and nourishing ingredients and free from gluten, dairy and refined sugar. It is brimming with things I want to eat and all the recipes are full of ingredients I like using in my own desserts. Most of the book contains recipes for delicious sweet cakes, tarts, cookies, chocolate, etc. however, there are several savory options as well. These tarts caught my eye and if you’ve been reading my blog long enough, you’ll know I love making savory tarts just as much as I do sweet ones. Don’t be fooled into thinking that these are less decadent than a sweet tart, they’re not. What they are is incredibly rich and utterly delicious! The combination of spices in the crust is really tasty, as is the cashew béchamel in fact I’m sure you’ll be planning all sorts of other ways to use it as soon as you realize how quick and easy it is to make. Once the growing season gets underway I think these tartlets could be topped with your favorite combination of roasted spring or summer vegetables too.

I have left the recipe below as it appears in Clean Cakes. Here are a few changes/notes I made:

I replaced the pecans with a combination of raw walnuts and almonds.

Used extra virgin olive oil in place of rapeseed oil

After I made these tarts, I realized that they also happen to be grain free (obviously didn’t read the head notes!), which will be great for those of you who can’t normally eat a tart. Next time I would probably add some oat or buckwheat flour to help the crust press more easily. It’s a little crumbly and delicate once it’s baked, but surprisingly light and crisp.

I found that the béchamel became very thick rather quickly so I whisked in about half a cup of water. It didn’t affect the flavor and the texture was silky and scrumptious.

I ended up with 9 4-inch tartlets, if you want to bake a larger one see Henrietta’s notes below.

Roasted root vegetable tarts with spiced sesame crust

Recipe from Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman 2016. Published with permission from Quarto Publishing Group USA.

These sublime savoury tarts pack a super flavour punch. A spicy base made with

sesame seeds and toasted pecans is covered in a light and creamy cashew béchamel,

all topped off with an abundant mix of sweet and earthy carrots and beetroot. They

are grain-free, vegan and perfect for a comforting but light lunch or supper.

Roasted root vegetables

4 large carrots, about 600 g (1 lb 5 oz)

4 beetroot, about 550 g (1 lb 3 oz)

2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped or

3 tbsp EVCP rapeseed oil or coconut oil,

melted, plus extra for greasing

Generous bunch of fresh herbs such as

coriander (cilantro) and parsley, finely

Spiced sesame and pecan crust

170 g (6 oz/1½ cups) ground pecan nuts

105 g (3¾ oz/scant 1 cup) ground

½ tsp each ground coriander, cumin,

turmeric, ginger and cardamom

65 ml (2¼ fl oz/¼ cup) EVCP rapeseed oil

85 g (3 oz/⅔ cup) black and white

Cashew béchamel

25 g (¾ oz/2 tbsp) coconut oil

40 g (1½ oz/generous ⅓ cup) chickpea (gram) flour

450 ml (15 fl oz/scant 2 cups) cashew milk, see below

3 tsp nutritional yeast flakes

Coarse sea salt and black pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 175°C/345°F/Gas Mark 3½. Grease six round 10 x 2 cm deep

Peel and cut the tops off the carrots. Cut them lengthways into about 3 cm

(1¼ inch) long pieces, then quarter into small crudité-sized strips. Scrub the

beetroot, quarter them and slice the same thickness as the carrots. Peel, quarter

and slice the onions. On a large baking tray, mix up the vegetables with the garlic,

oil and a generous amount of salt and black pepper, if using. Roast for about 1

hour, checking halfway through. They are ready when a skewer inserts easily into

the centre of the vegetables. Remove from the oven, adjust the seasoning while

Meanwhile, to make the base, combine the ground pecans, almonds, spices, salt,

oil and water in a food processor. Add the sesame seeds and blitz until the mix

looks like breadcrumbs and sticks together when you pick up a piece of it in your

hand. Divide the pastry mix between the greased tins, you will get about 70 g

(2½ oz) per tart, and press it down with your fingertips and a step palette knife

(frosting spatula) to make the crust, pressing it into the edges and making sure it

is even. Put the tins on a baking tray and bake in the same oven as the vegetables

for about 15–20 minutes or until dark golden brown. Leave to cool.

To make the béchamel, melt the coconut oil in a small saucepan. Add the gram

flour and whisk in vigorously. Add the mustard and then gradually start to add

the cashew milk, stirring constantly with a whisk. The sauce should start to

thicken and look smooth. Add the yeast flakes and salt and pepper to taste. Stir

again and taste and season more if necessary. You can make this in advance for

use later, but note that when it cools it will thicken slightly, so before filling your

tarts with it, return to the heat and add some extra milk to loosen.

Finish off the vegetables by adding the freshly chopped herbs and a drizzle of

extra virgin olive oil, if necessary. Mix the béchamel with a whisk until really

smooth, use it to fill the tarts and then top with all of the vegetables, pushing

them into the béchamel slightly. Serve with salad or steamed green vegetables.

These tarts are great served warm or cold and keep well for three days in the

To make one large tart, line a 27–28 cm (10½–11 inch) tart tin with the above quantity of

pastry and increase the baking time to 15–20 minutes or until dark golden brown, then

Cashew milk

Makes 900ml (31 fl oz /scant 4 cups) nut milk

200g (7oz/about 1 1/2 cups) cashews

600ml (21 fl oz/ 2 1/2 cups) filtered water

Pinch pink Himalayan salt or sea salt

Soak cashews for 3 to 4 hours. Drain and rinse thoroughly.

Place in blender with water and salt and blend until smooth.

Strain through a nut milk bag or several layers of cheese cloth. Store milk in the fridge for upto 5 days.


Black-and-White Sesame Tarts - Recipes

This recipe does best when baked in a 6-cup jumbo muffin pan with parchment lotus cup liners. If you can't find toasted sesame seeds, heat a medium skillet over medium. Add the sesame seeds and heat, shaking the pan often until the seeds are fragrant and ever so slightly smoking. Immediately remove from the heat and pour onto a large plate to cool.

1/2 cup black sesame seeds, toasted

1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar

Two 16.3-ounce cans refrigerated original flaky biscuits

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter

Zest of a quarter of an orange

Black sesame seeds, toasted

White sesame seeds, toasted

Heat the oven to 375 degrees.

Place the black sesame seeds into a spice grinder or small food processor. Add both sugars and a big pinch of salt. Process until finely and evenly ground. Pour the black sesame-sugar mixture into a gallon zip-close bag and set aside.

Pop open the cans of biscuits, then cut each biscuit into 6 even pieces (cut each round in half, then cut each of those halves into 3 pieces). Drop them into the plastic bag, seal and shake with zeal. Don't worry if some of the pieces stick together and don't get covered in the black sugar. These bits will go golden brown in the oven and make your monkey bread even prettier! Set aside.

In a small saucepan over medium-low, melt the butter. Stir in the honey and continue to stir vigorously until the honey dissolves into the butter. Remove the pan from the heat and add a pinch of salt and the orange zest.

Line the muffin pan with the lotus cups. Place 6 to 7 pieces of sugar-encrusted biscuit dough in each cup, pushing them together slightly. Pour 1 tablespoon of the honey-butter mixture over each cup, then sprinkle with black and white sesame seeds. Top with a pinch of salt, then bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow to cool in the muffin pan for 5 minutes, then remove the cups to a rack to cool. Repeat with remaining mixture. Serve warm.


Quick Sauteed Cabbage Cooking Instructions

Cut the cabbage and give it a rub: Cut up the cabbage and toss it along with all the other ingredients into a large bowl. Get your hands in there and massage the cabbage, squeezing it in your hands to get the flavours really rubbed in.

Heat oil on high and cook it fast: In the meantime heat about 2 teaspoons of vegetable oil on high in a wok or just a skillet. When the oil is hot, throw in the cabbage. Sautee for about 5 minutes, mixing constantly so it cooks evenly.


Black sesame pudding recipe (kuro goma purin 黒ごまプリン)

black and white food .

Neurologist and prolific writer Oliver Sacks immortalized the case of the colorblind artist in his case-study book An Anthropologist on Mars. He recounts the history of this man: a seemingly mild concussion after a car accident, his inability to first distinguish letters and colors, then the progressive development of the inability to distinguish any color at all, relegating any color in the world to grey scale by his sight. He did not confuse the colors as a person with congenital colorblindness would, but did not see the colors around him. His brain was unable to perceive color, and therefore, not see it. The medical term for this is achromatopsia.

If one’s sight is relegated to only shades of grey, I can imagine one could develop a deft ability to distinguish between varieties of greys like grey-blues, grey-greens, grey-browns as well as grey scale spectrum. Grey is an inbetween of sorts, the blending and balance of the expansive black and the virginial white. Literally, the word grey means “without color.” It is a color of humbleness, of modesty, of simplicity. It can also represent magnitudes of the good and bad, ambiguous morality, or even a middle ground. It can be a limbo, a fog between light and dark, a sadness. This grey, it is everything.

This everything, was how I felt during the time that I first made this pudding. I was on maternity leave last summer, experimenting with as many recipes as I could before the somewhat impending doom of work was upon me. Post-partum hormones made my usual sunny days with Sky-Girl seem gloomy at times, my body weary and my every thought sighing. Days were sometimes simple with my infant daughter sometimes they were twisted in palpable fog. It seemed to be slow moving, like tangles of seaweed pulling me underwater at times. It was some overcast thought that darkened some event that would normally bring a smile to my face. Grub telling me joke or Peach drawing a picture of me and Baby Sky-Girl seemed glib sometimes, when these things were absolutely constructed to make me deeply happy. This grey, it was everywhere.

It first was a flat grey permeating my life. Slowly, I began to see the nuances of the blues and greens, a few browns. The grey-blue color of the morning light. The grey-green flecks of sequoias and redwoods. The deep grey-brown of Sky-Girl’s eyes. While this grey is ubiquitous even now, its crinkly edges are more brightly colored. I prefer to think of my clouds without a silver lining, but one of colors. Peach’s brightly colored red hair. The color of Grub’s tongue after eating a bowlful of blueberries. Sky-Girl’s luscious pink thighs. Throw in some grey food once in awhile, and we’re still okay.

And so I give you this black sesame pudding, a dessert on my grayscale, though I argue this is no middle ground dessert. Black sesame is a typical flavoring in Japanese desserts, this flavor being one of my favorites. Black sesame ice cream, panna cotta, candy, milk, whatever it is, I will taste it. Don’t let your culinary monochromia get in the way of trying something new. Sit down with this dessert and a good Oliver Sacks book: your understanding of color or lack thereof may suprise you.

NOTE: I used the agar agar more effectively than gelatin for this recipe. The pudding sets up faster at room temperature with the agar agar, compared to the refrigerator for the gelatin. It tastes better at room temperature, in my opinion. You could also make this a vegan recipe by replacing the milk and cream with full-fat coconut milk or cashew milk.

One year ago: cong you ban mian (noodles with fried scallions) and vietnamese pickled diakon and carrots (do chua)


Watch the video: Black Snowy Mooncakes Black Sesame u0026 Walnut. 黑芝麻核桃冰皮月饼 (August 2022).