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Food Tank Book of the Week: Tomatoland by Barry Estabrook

Food Tank Book of the Week: Tomatoland by Barry Estabrook


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In Tomatoland, Barry Estabrook investigates why large and bright red tomatoes are filling the supermarket year-round. While Estabrook exposes the harsh reality of the tomato industry, his accounts of migrant workers, activists, and scientists provide hope for change in a damaged food system.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.


ALABAMA CONFIDENTIAL

**NY Times "Delay in Coal Pollution Rules Took Toll in Lives"
For clean air advocates, the release of the rules is a milestone. But for some they will have come too late.
“This could have been done 20 years ago,” Mr. Bachmann said. “These delays, as they’ve mounted up, have had a cost in people dying sooner. And it’s not trivial.”

12 comments:

What's equally troubling is the stance of Alabama's Supreme Court and the district courts who have gone from tort friendly to big business protectors. No in-between, just one extreme to the other.

This problem occurs on a national level too:

"Senator Whitehouse called on all Americans to remember that the Constitution provides not just basic rights, but a mechanism to make sure that those rights cannot be trampled by wealthy and powerful interests:

The jury serves as our last sanctuary, as Americans, when the forces of society may be arrayed against us: when the governor’s mansion has been bought by special interests when lobbyists have the legislature tied in knots when the newspaper owners have steered public opinion against you – the hard square corners of the jury box stand firm against the influence and money of special interests.

If an egregious act of exposure occurs to a community or citizen in this state, they are first limited by a restrictive time frame to bring legal action. Then further disadvantaged by supreme court justices who are where they are courtesy of corporate influence.

The same can be said for most members of the legislature.

All of this makes for an insidious soup of corruption that is designed to oppress the economically disadvantaged.

Adding religious influences that are also co-opted by corporate puppet masters ensures that Alabama's poor are almost no better off than they were one hundred years ago.



Comments:

  1. Baptiste

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  2. Kingsley

    I think you are making a mistake. I can defend my position. Email me at PM, we will discuss.

  3. Raydon

    What a necessary sentence ... great, excellent idea

  4. Akinocage

    strange, I myself came to this, only later, judging by the date of the post. but thanks anyway.

  5. Hu

    Where do you get the info for posts if it's not a secret?

  6. T'iis

    the complete tastelessness

  7. Yokinos

    I congratulate, what an excellent answer.

  8. Kirr

    Class!



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